passive cooling

Terrified of Summer Heat? Passive Cooling Really Works!

There is no denying that the summer has been an absolute scorcher. With record-breaking heat waves experienced across the globe, it is simply terrifying how intense the heat can be. Last June, temperatures were recorded at 1.8°C warmer than in the pre-industrial period. Many more hot days are on the cards with an anticipated 27.7 days annually above 30 °C between 2021 and 2050 in Canada alone. When compared to the 11.9 days between 1976 and 2005, climate change is on a heated mission.

So how do many of us try to soothe the discomfort of the heat? With cooling solutions, most of which cause a significant spike in energy consumption reflected in a higher energy bill. We’re here with a suggestion for you to beat the summer terrifying heat: Passive Cooling.

What is Passive Cooling and does it work?

Simply put, passive cooling refers to techniques used to keep the temperatures inside of a building comfortable without the use of energy-hungry solutions like fans, air conditioning, or heat pumps.

Research in the Pacific Northwest, conducted by the University of Oregon found the effectiveness of passive cooling techniques. The research team used a computer program to generate conditions inside of a west-facing, two-bedroom apartment with different cooling solutions, with data from a 2021 heat wave.

A strategic combination of shading and ventilation reduced apartment temperatures for a full 72 hours, without air conditioning. The burden on the air conditioning was reduced by 80 percent. The study has the potential to inform building codes where apartments with operable windows can keep them open overnight, aided by shading.

Passive cooling techniques – opening the window at optimal times and use of shading – can therefore make living conditions bearable, even in extreme heat.

How can you get started with Passive Cooling?

Knowing when to open your windows is key, especially since the study found night and early morning to effectively cool down the apartment. Shading is far from a new concept but it can be classified as a passive cooling technique that works best with ventilation. There’s no better way to beat the heat than to stop the heat from reaching your windows and doors.

Can I create a Cool Sunroom?

In addition to implementing passive cooling techniques, we can help you create a cool atmosphere in your home with the addition of a sunroom. If you want to create an oasis at home to escape the heat, consider having your sunroom created with Habitat Screens. Habitat Screens provide relief from the sun which not only helps the atmosphere of your home but protects your furniture. What’s even better is the view preservation as you still have a clear view of your surroundings from the sunroom.

Rollshutters create the fortress you need to completely escape the sun and are a great choice for your sunroom.

Passive cooling techniques are worth the try this summer to escape the terrifying summer heat. At Natural Light Edmonton, we can help you create a cool space to relax in comfort at home.